Your Birth Month May Predict Your Health

Hippocrates, the father of medicine whose name lives on in his eponymous oath, once hypothesized a connection between a person's birth month and the health problems she or he will experience in life.

More than two millennia later, researchers have published a study in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association that highlights the sorts of ailments you're more likely to develop based on your birthday. Scroll down to see what your month has in store for you.

January

Feeling stressed? Your birthday might be to blame: you're prone to having high blood pressure. You're also less susceptible to vomiting - after New Year's Day, at least.

February

Take a deep breath: you're prone to respiratory conditions from lung cancer to getting stuff caught in your throat. But you're less likely to develop a slew of ailments, including fevers, postpartum depression, ADHD and nonvenomous insect bites. (Hopefully that doesn't mean tarantulas find you tasty.)

March

You should eat right and exercise to overcome your predisposition to congestive heart failure and coronary heart disease. But making lifestyle changes and sticking to them shouldn't be a problem: you have the lowest threshold for difficulty adjusting to change, ADHD, and learning disabilities.

April

You need to take care of your heart since you're prone to angina, chronic myocardial ischemia and heart complications following surgery. But that shouldn't get you down or make you lose sight of your goals: you literally don't bruise easily, and you have the lowest rates for vision loss and impairment.

May

You aren't prone to developing anything - but don't get carried away with enjoying your good health. Remember: disease neutrality isn't immortality!

June

You're less likely to need STI screening and more likely to have multiple children (if you're a woman). But you're also susceptible to asthma attacks, so be sure to work on that lamaze breathing.

July

Like those born in May, you aren't likelier to develop any conditions more than others. You also have a tough stomach as you're the least likely group to suffer from diarrhea.

August

Wash your clothes regularly and avoiding wearing contacts to overcome your proclivity for pink eye. Unfortunately, you aren't less likely to develop any conditions over others, so no "get out of jail free" card for you!

September

You need to find balance to overcome your tendency to vomit, develop disorienting ear infections, and experience depression as well as anxiety. While life might seem out-of-control at times, your heart's strong enough to help you get through life's challenges.

October

You're likely to develop stomach problems, impaired vision and non-venomous insect bites. But those things won't cause you much stress: you're the least likely group to develop high blood pressure.

November

Sorry, but you have a laundry list of susceptibilities that includes ADHD, opiate dependence, false labor, diarrhea, learning disabilities and viral infections. But there's a bright side: your heart valves are clear and you're less susceptible to lung cancer.

December

As your friends and family probably already know, you literally bruise easily. But that's the only problem you're more likely to develop than others. On the downside, you aren't less likely to develop any ailments. But things could be worse: you could've been born in November.

h/t Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association

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