You Can And Should Wake Up Early to Workout. Here’s Why.

You're not a morning person. It's hot out. You need to finish this dream about swimming with monkeys. There are myriad reasons for not exercising in the morning. Fortunately, they are all in your head. Overcoming your aversion to working up a sweat before working at your desk is easier (and more necessary) than you think. Here's why.

You Will Suddenly 'Find the Time' to Work Out

The idea that you are too busy to hit the gym is not totally unfounded. Maybe you mean to exercise frequently, but constantly find that spin classes and sit ups get pushed aside to make way for urgent emails that blindside you at the end of the day. By squeezing a work out in before your day 'starts,' you eliminate the chances of it dropping off of your to-do list. An hour or so isn't really much of a time commitment. Knock it out in the morning, and it will feel like a distant memory by the time you're knee-deep in your inbox.

It Doesn't Actually Matter Whether You're a Morning Person

'Early' is a relative term when it comes to scheduling exercise. If you shudder at the thought of seeing a beautiful sunrise, fret not. The idea is not so much to get up before everyone else starts their day, but rather, to get up slightly earlier and work out before you start your day. If you're a night owl who regularly works past midnight, it's not realistic or helpful to drag yourself out of bed at 5. Instead, aim to wake up just an hour earlier than you normally would and jump into your sneakers. Exercising outside can get a little trickier later in the day during summer months, when temperatures peak, so on hotter days opt for a gym session or an indoor class.

Let's be Honest, You Love an Excuse to Wake and Bake

If you have a hard time motivating yourself to get out of bed, reward yourself with a couple of puffs of a sativa or your favorite CBD-based strain before you head out. Moderate cannabis use can be a great way to lift your mood and get you even more excited about that new playlist you made. It also helps with stamina and pain relief. Get your heart rate up and your endorphins flowing, and you’ll finish your workout session feeling clear-headed and excited to start the day.

You’ll be More Productive

A large number of CEOs and other successful people report that exercise is part of their daily morning routine. This is because 'just doing it' and getting shit done go hand-in-hand. Exercise decreases stress, increases your ability to focus, and can also help boost your creativity. Once you've found a way to sneak it into your day, you'll perform better at work, and be able to get more done, as you won't be derailed by the useless distractions that are the pastimes of an anxious mind: checking social media, over-snacking, needlessly napping. Finding that extra hour to hit the gym when you get up will mean going to bed a little earlier in the evening, but the odds are that those final hours before bed are ones in which you weren't getting much done anyway. (Deep dive of your ex’s new flame’s best friend’s Instagram, anyone?)

When You Work Out Early, at Least One Thing Goes Well in Your Day

From the startling string of news alerts that hit your phone with horrific frequency, to the parking tickets that come out of nowhere, there's no telling what unfortunate surprises the day may bring you. Starting out with an activity that is peaceful and mood boosting puts you at the center of your experience, and guarantees that no matter what else happens as the hours tick by, you will have done one thing that made you feel good about yourself. Or, at the very least, you would have seen a cute dog or two.

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