Why Donald Trump Refuses to Get a Pet for the White House

The White House is not only home to American presidents but their presidential pets as well. But Donald Trump isn't interested in continuing that tradition. Even though the president says "a lot of people” say he should get a dog because “it’s good politically,” Trump refuses to get a pet for the White House.

During a recent appearance in El Paso, President Trump lavishly praised the skills of the highly trained drug-sniffing dogs employed by the Secret Service. The man even said that he "wouldn't mind having one," if he had the time to take care of it. It was a statement that almost would have made him look like a real and relatable human being, that is before he contradicted himself mere seconds later.

"How would I look walking a dog on the White House lawn," Trump asked the crowd, shaking his head and flailing his arms about disapprovingly. "I don't know, I don't feel good. Feels a little phony, phony to me."

Of course, the only reason it would "feel phony" to Donald Trump is because a long line of former presidents kept dogs and other pets while living at the White House. Obama had his two Portuguese water dogs—Bo and Sunny; Clinton had a Lab called Buddy and a cat named Socks.

Presidential pet ownership actually extends all the way back to the likes of Washington and Jefferson who both kept an assortment of animals while in office. Trump certainly wouldn't want to emulate any of those men.

With over half of US households having at least one pet as part of the family (and 38 percent owning at least one dog) Trump doesn't seem to want to align himself with his constituents very much either. 

At least we still have VP Mike Pence's bunny rabbit, Marlon Bundo, occupying a room in the White Housefor whatever that's worth.

Maybe Trump could redeem himself (even if just slightly) by stepping up and adopting one of those drug-sniffing dogs he loves so much who are being laid off because of marijuana legalization. But that's probably wishful thinking.

H/T: Time

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