If you haven't heard of OG Kush, you're pretty new to the cannabis game. OG Kush is a legendary and highly desired strain of marijuana that is even familiar to many non-users. Much debate surrounds the origins of what “OG” stands for, and contenders for the acronym include “original gangster,” which recognize it as one of the primary base strains used in modern marijuana hybridization, “ocean grown,” as a nod to its origins in the California coast, and few other more far-fetched theories.

You can easily identify a true OG Kush bud before you feel its effects based on the way it looks and smells. The compact, medium-sized flowers are usually a bright green and covered in crystalline trichomes that will leave a sticky resin on your fingers. The flowers contain many terpenes including limonene, humulene, and pinene, which combine to give OG Kush its signature earthy, sour aroma.

Like the origins of its name, the genetic history of OG Kush is to this day unclear. Tradition holds that OG Kush is a hybrid strain created from Hindu Kush, an indica, and Chemdawg, a sativa, but others claim it to be just a distinctive variety of Chemdawg. OG Kush may have always been a unique variety in its own right, a phenotype of an existing strain, since it came to California in an undocumented seed bag in the early 1990s.

If you plan to grow an OG Kush plant yourself, be aware it is a notoriously difficult marijuana variety to cultivate. OG Kush prefers a dry, outdoor climate and takes about 8-9 weeks to flower, and while growing indoors is possible you should take into account its pungent smell. Also, be aware that OG Kush is a principle building block strain if you want to take up cross-breeding.

Consumers of OG Kush tout its ability to lower stress, relieve headaches, and help one attain focus if dealing with an attention deficit disorder focus. OG Kush strains produce mentally-stimulating highs with energizing, uplifting effects that can build to a sense of euphoria rather than a purely physical “body buzz.” Remember that OG Kush will affect each user differently, and since it is known for its potency and consistently high THC composition, it may not be best for a first-timer.