Even diehard fans of 'Wayne's World' have to admit that the followup, 'Wayne's World 2', was totally bogus - especially considering the insane sequel that we almost got. Earlier this year, the sequel's producer Lorne Michaels and director Stephen Surjik revealed what might have been for Wayne Campbell (Mike Myers) and Garth Algar (Dana Carvey) if the studio hadn't demanded a rewrite and slaughtered the original set with chainsaws.

The sequel we got was pretty much a retread of the first film. Once again, Wayne almost lost his main squeeze Cassandra (Tia Carrere) to a slimy businessman (played by Christopher Walken instead of Rob Lowe). Once again Wayne had to deal with biting off more than he could chew in the entertainment industry - this time by getting mixed up in promoting a concert. And once again he managed not to choke thanks to the magic of breaking the fourth wall.

But the sequel we almost got was entirely different. After finding an ancient scroll, Wayne and Garth would have seceded part of America from the union and run it as their own independent country. The film was based on Mike Meyers' adaptation of the 1949 British comedy 'Passport to Pimlico' - in which a section of London split from the rest of England after a similar old scroll was found.

But instead of seeing Wayne and Garth trying to run their own country, we got this.

But that's pretty good considering the circumstances on the set of 'Wayne's World 2,' which allegedly left Myers sobbing in the fetal position at one point. The problem with Myers' adaptation was that nobody bothered to buy the rights to the source material before production was underway.

"Mike had always wanted to do 'Passport to Pimlico' as the basis," producer Lorne Michaels recalled. "So he went and wrote it. I think he believed the studio understood that, and I think he even believed they had bought the rights to the other movie so that he was free to use it."

But they hadn't. So production would have to be suspended indefinitely until the rights were acquired. And if the holders refused to okay the project, the film would never be released. Which was a huge problem because Paramount Pictures had already spent money on promoting the sequel. That meant Myers had cost the studio time and money with nothing to show for it. So Sherry Lansing - who was CEO of Paramount Pictures at the time -summoned Myers to her office for a verbal beatdown.

"'How dare you? How dare you put us in this position?'" Lansing said according to the new biography 'Leading Lady: Sherry Lansing and the Making of a Hollywood Groundbreaker' (2017). Then "[s]he turned to Mike and said, 'We'll sue you. We'll take your fucking house. You won’t even own a fucking home."

Myers tried to play hardball by threatening to walk away from the production, but his wild pitch wound up in the dirt. "Let me tell you something," Lansing shot back. "As we're sitting here, there's a team of lawyers assembled...that has nothing better to do than to figure out how to sue you for everything you're worth. As I'm sitting here with you, there's a team figuring out how to take every single thing away from you.'"

That's when Myers assumed the fetal position, according to biographer Stephen Galloway's source. But Lansing didn't relent. “If I were you, Mike, I'd go to Lorne's office right now and stay there until you come up with a new script. We'll slide food under the door," she said according to Galloway's book.

But at least he left the meeting in one piece. The set of the movie wasn't so lucky. Director Surjik said Paramount made a show of force by slaughtering the movie's soundstage. “I could hear the chainsaws literally chopping the sets down,” Surjik revealed earlier this year. He never made a Hollywood movie again.

Myers bounced back a few years later with 'Austin Powers'...which was distributed by New Line Cinema.