Not For Kids: Washington State Introduces Warning Labels For Edibles

Considering that infused goodies can look identical to normal, kid-friendly snacks, it's important to explain to the little ones why they can't go around snacking on random goodies they find in the house.

Dr. Alexander Garrard, managing director of the Washington Poison Center (WAPC), tells Western Washington news station K5 the center has received in excess of 150 calls about kids accidentally ingesting cannabis products this year.

To help parents and guardians out with the safety conversation, the Washington Poison Center (WAPC) will introduce a brand new warning symbol to identify cannabis products.

The red, stop-right-there symbol, which bears the phrase "NOT FOR KIDS" in block caps - will be used in lieu of the "Mr. Yuk" sticker placed on poisonous items. Happily, the state Liquor and Cannabis Board concluded cannabis products aren't poison - and so deserve their own, non-Mr-Yuk symbol.

The Washington's Liquor and Cannabis Board expects the label to me mandatory for these products by January of next year.

The WAPC's safety materials also include the following age-appropriate talking tips:

h/t King 5, Leafly.

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