Of the eight states in America that have legalized recreational marijuana, Washington is the only one that does not allow citizens to grow small amounts of the plant in their own home. But a new proposal would change that.

The Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board recently held hearings to discuss a proposed law that would allow residents to grow small amounts of marijuana in their homes. The board is studying the issue, and will send a recommendation to the state legislature by December 1st either in favor or opposing the change.

The board is currently considering three proposals on the issue. One would require residents to obtain a permit to grow up to four plants, and stay in constant contact with the government over the status of their crops. A second option would allow up to four plants but not require growers to keep the government apprised of the status of their plants. And a third option would keep marijuana grows banned in households except for medical purposes.

The board's working to figure out a way to allow homegrown marijuana without violating the Cole Memo, a document produced by the Department of Justice that outlines how states can legalize marijuana without intervention from the federal government. But again, all states that have already legalized marijuana have also allowed homegrown marijuana plants. So if Colorado and Oregon haven't been harassed by the Feds over cannabis plants in homes, why would Washington?