The TSA Says You Can Now Bring CBD On Any US Flight

The TSA will no longer prevent you from bringing federally legal CBD on your flight.

Cannabis' status as a federally banned substance means it's technically illegal to bring on any planes within the US. While several airports in legal states have loosened rules around traveling with cannabis in recent months, most still hold strict bans on flying with weed.

But as of this week, certain cannabis products are now allowed on all US flights. The TSA has updated their cannabis policies to be more in line with changes to federal law that saw certain cannabis products legalized nationally at the end of last year.

"Products/medications that contain hemp-derived CBD or are approved by the FDA are legal as long as it is produced within the regulations defined by the law under the Agriculture Improvement Act 2018," reads the TSA's new cannabis policy.

CBD in a non-intoxicating cannabis compound largely used for its medicinal qualities. It's commonly found in all types of cannabis, but only hemp-derived CBD is federally legal (thanks to President Trump signing the Farm Bill into law last fall). However, the TSA began work on updating their cannabis policy last year, when the FDA approved the cannabis-based anti-seizure medication Epidiolex.

"TSA was made aware of an FDA-approved drug that contains CBD oil for children who experience seizures from pediatric epilepsy," a TSA spokesperson told Marijuana Moment. "To avoid confusion as to whether families can travel with this drug, TSA immediately updated TSA.gov once we became aware of the issue."

TSA maintains that any cannabis product containing the intoxicating compound THC is still illegal and can't be brought aboard an airplane. People trying to bring these products with them will be reported to the authorities.

So while this new policy isn't perfect, it will certainly make air travel a whole lot more convenient for many medical marijuana patients across the country.

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For cannabis enthusiasts living in adult use states, long gone are the days of sneaking around with a dime bag in a coat pocket and worrying about whether the neighbors know you’ve got weed. But the sad truth is that, for millions of Americans living in prohibition or restrictive medical-only states, accessing safe and regulated cannabis is still a problem. But does that mean that those living without access to the regulated market are abstaining from cannabis altogether?

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