None of Trump's Attorney General Candidates Like Marijuana

Marijuana advocates in the United States celebrated when news broke that Jeff Sessions was resigning as Attorney General. But it turns out whoever replaces him may not be any better.

The candidates being considered by the Trump administration to replace Sessions as Attorney General are not any more friendly towards to cannabis than the man who just held the post. The leading frontrunner appears to be former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who has opposed marijuana legalization for years, called marijuana tax revenue "blood money" and said during his run for president in 2016 he would crack down on legalized states if elected.

But Christie isn't the only anti-marijuana candidate being considered. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is another candidate for the position, and she's been one of the most ardent anti-marijuana advocates since Florida legalized medical marijuana. She's strongly defended the state's ban on smoking marijuana, and has attempted to block expansion as much as possible.

Another candidate who's recently sprung up is Texas Republican Congress John Ratcliffe. Ratcliffe did sponsor a bill that would remove CBD from the federal controlled substances list, but has voted against all other pieces of marijuana reform in his career.

Other candidates including former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and current Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar also hold anti-marijuana views.

The only candidate who doesn't seem to be too anti-marijuana is Republican Congressman Trey Gowdy. Gowdy made waves last year when questioning an official from the Office of National Drug Control Policy, and asked why marijuana is a Schedule I substance, and therefore is considered more dangerous than cocaine. However, despite that questioning, Gowdy hasn't endorsed marijuana legalization.

So while Sessions may be gone, we shouldn't expect the Trump administration to appoint anyone who's any more open to the cause as the previous Attorney General.

(h/t Motley Fool)

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