That ’10 Hours of Ocean Sounds’ YouTube video not quite doing it for you?

Try going one step deeper – literally – with one of a growing number of increasingly freaky and futuristic products designed to steer your headspace in the right direction during times of stress.  

Take Thync, for example, the “mood altering” headset that stimulates your brain with small electric currents that promote focus or relaxation in the wearer.

Users simply attach the $299 device to their forehead and select via an app whether they want chill or energetic vibes delivered straight to their brainwaves via electrical currents.   

If that doesn’t sound spooky enough for you, consider the fact that if the device is improperly applied, it can induce a painful pins-and-needles sensation. Worth it?

Foc.us is another stimulation device, which developers say works by “exciting brain cells and thereby moving them closer to their action potential.” While the device was made for gamers seeking an edge over their competition, the company says anyone can use it – so long as they cough up $1,200, of course.

If meditation is what you’re looking for, you may want to consider Muse, which measures whether you’re calm or stressed via electroencephalography (EEG) sensors.

If Muse senses that you’re chilled out, you’ll hear soothing breezes and eventually chirping birds through the speakers.  If you start to get stressed, however, the device will pick up on the shift in your mood and the sound of the wind will rise. This is meant to act as your cue to center yourself and relax. If you succeed, the birds will return. Those chirps could be yours for $299.  

Of course, we’ve all been told at one point or another during times of stress to simply breathe deeply. The Spire takes that advice one step further by actually counting your breaths. The $149 wearable device tells you how stressed you are and recommends calming exercises.

If you’re on a budget, a good old-fashioned stress ball will run you no more than $3. There’s something to be said, however, for the added benefit of feeling like a robot intrinsic to any one of these new-age devices. After all, what could be more calming than channeling something incapable of human emotion?

h/t Forbes