The world’s opinion of the United States has soured in the wake of the 2016 presidential election, a new study has found.

An annual survey on the best countries in the world, conducted by Y&R’s BAV Consulting and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, revealed that America is now considered the seventh best country in the world. Last year (prior to the election), it was ranked fourth.

“Our data captured widespread global concern for the social and geopolitical changes that cast many nations into uncertainty and turmoil,” said John Gerzema, chief executive of BAV Consulting.

“The new rankings reflect people’s desire to restore some sense of order by rewarding nations they perceive as championing neutrality, stability and diplomacy.”

The survey polled more than 21,000 people described by organizers as “business leaders, informed elites and general citizens.” Its rankings prioritized countries with relative peace and prosperity, with the results being divided by categories like the most powerful country, the best country in which to invest, and the best country for women, children and retirees.

Switzerland earned the title of best country overall, based on its attitude toward education, democracy, business and quality of life. Canada came in second, followed by Britain. Germany slid to fourth place from its top ranking last year, thanks in part to a slate of terrorist attacks and political tension. Japan came in fifth place.

The United States fell three places due to bad reviews for the country’s business friendliness, respect for human rights and democracy, and its educational quality. Respondents also reported having less desire to visit the country.

Nearly 75 percent of respondents said they lost some degree of respect for the U.S. after the election of Donald Trump as president.

Nonetheless, America was still viewed by respondents as the most powerful country in the world, based on its military and economic power, along with its political influence.

Sweden was ranked the best country in the world for women, while the U.S. was ranked 16th. This ranking was based on how respondents viewed a country’s position on human rights, gender equality, income equality, safety and overall progressive attitude.

In terms of the best countries to raise a child, Sweden again came in first. The United States came in 19th, based on respondents’ feelings about the country’s commitment to human rights, gender equality, income equality, public education and health.

Finally, when it came to countries that respondents would consider moving to in their retirement if price was no obstacle, the United States didn’t even make the top 20.

In conclusion: yikes. 

h/t The New York Times