The War on Drugs Can't Stop Crime, But It Can Create 'Meth-Gators'

A Tennessee police department is warning people that flushing meth down the toilet could create drug-crazed alligators, or 'meth-gators,' to use their words. So if you see an amphetamine-fueled reptile wreaking havoc in your neighborhood, you should thank the War on Drugs. 

One of the many negative effects of the ongoing drug war is that people often feel compelled to dispose of their drugs in unsafe ways. Basically, when a drug dealer or user hears the cops knocking on their door, dumping evidence becomes more important than pretty much anything else. So if disposing that contraband down the toilet is the only way to avoid doing time in prison, most dealers and users will gladly flush away, even if that quick solution poses massive problems to public waterways.

Flushing drugs down the toilet can expose animals to chemicals that are dangerous to them, and can make them more dangerous to us, according to the Loretto Police Department in Tennessee. After busting a man who was trying to flush his meth supply last week during a drug raid, the Loretto police went on Facebook to warn people about the dangers of dumping drugs down the toilet.

"Folks…please don't flush your drugs m'kay," said the tongue-in-cheek Facebook post. "When you send something down the sewer pipe it ends up in our retention ponds for processing before it is sent down stream. Now our sewer guys take great pride in releasing water that is cleaner than what is in the creek, but they are not really prepared for meth."

And neither are the animals who live in those waterways.

"Ducks, Geese, and other fowl frequent our treatment ponds and we shudder to think what one all hyped up on meth would do. Furthermore, if it made it far enough we could create meth-gators in Shoal Creek and the Tennessee River down in North Alabama. They've had enough methed up animals the past few weeks without our help. So, if you need to dispose of your drugs just give us a call and we will make sure they are disposed of in the proper way."

Of course, anyone who takes the police up on that offer risks the possibility of getting arrested for possessing prohibited substances.

So the best way to prevent 'meth-gators' from becoming a thing is to eliminate the reason why so many people flush drugs down the toilet. By taking a public-safety instead of a criminal-justice approach to combating the distribution and consumption of illicit drugs in America, policy makers could eliminate the fear of incarceration that sees so many offenders take drastic steps to avoid doing time.

h/t AL

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