Nova Scotians are being asked to weigh in on how the province should shape its legal cannabis framework.

The provincial government launched a survey on Friday requesting input on issues like the legal age to consume recreational cannabis, where it should be available and where it should be used. The survey will run until Oct. 27 and its results will be released before the end of the year.

While Nova Scotia is the last of the Atlantic provinces to launch cannabis consultations, the survey at least seems to indicate the government has started considering its options ahead of nationwide cannabis legalization next summer. For example, the provincial government is apparently looking at a legal age of 19, as well as using existing Crown corporations like the NSLC to sell cannabis.  

Of residents, the survey asks whether or not cannabis should be sold in standalone stores on alongside alcohol. It also asks whether the government should adopt additional provincial consequences for cannabis-impaired driving.

Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil told The Chronicle Herald that while he believes things like age requirements and price should stay consistent across the Atlantic provinces to avoid cross-border shopping, the same can’t necessarily be said for sale and distribution methods.

Neighboring New Brunswick has suggested a legal age of 19 for cannabis consumption.

“The distribution could be different in each province; that’s not so much an issue. Each one will find their own way, but certainly surrounding some of the regulations, particularly the age one, (consistency) will be important,” McNeil said.

“A lot of work has been done already in our province. There’s work across the country happening (and) when you look at best practices we can certainly learn from other jurisdictions, not only in Canada but also in the U.S., who have already legalized this product, to make sure we’re ready for July 1.”

From Nova Scotia? Let the government know your thoughts on local cannabis regulations here

h/t The Chronicle Herald