Massachusetts offers hikers many opportunities to explore some of New England's most diverse and beautiful terrains to see mountain ranges, forests, and coastline. We've highlighted five of the Bay State's best hikes, based on recommendations from Trails.com, to inspire your next adventure – so grab your camera, and happy trails!

The Alander Mountain Trail is one of the most scenic hikes you can take in the Berkshire Range, and it offers breathtaking views of the surrounding wilderness and neighboring states. You'll hike through the mixed woodlands of the Mount Washington State Forest as you follow the 5-mile loop, and you'll have a good chance of seeing wildlife such as wild turkey, beavers, and red eft.

You can follow the 13-mile Round of Mount Greylock to explore dense woodlands that are home to some endangered plants and animals. The Round takes hikers through the Hopper Valley past Money Brook Falls to Mount Greylock's summit, Massachusetts' highest peak, and offers inspiring sights of the surrounding towns and wilderness.

The Metacomet-Monadnock Trail (M&M Trail) is a 9-mile portion of the New England National Scenic Trail that takes hikers through the Holyoke Range past mixed woodlands, rocky outcrops, and mountain summits. You will find this hiking trail to be well-maintained but still quite rural, and you can take advantage of seasonal sights like changing leaves or the hawk migrations.

You can explore some of the Great Brook Farm State Park, which is nestled among the grounds of a working dairy farm, as you hike along the winding path of the Acorn Trail. Popular among local nature lovers, Acorn Trail is a 3-mile hike that loops through peaceful, prominently flat landscapes of woodlands, meadows, marshes, and swamps that are all frequented by wildlife.

The 2.6-mile trail to Purgatory Chasm takes hikers through mixed woodlands and past several precipices, boulders, and named rock formations, such as the Corn Crib, Fat Man's Misery, and Lovers' Leap. Purgatory Chasm is a natural fissure between solid granite walls that runs for ¼ mile to depths of 70 feet that gives hikers an opportunity to see a unique geological feature.