Geysers at Yellowstone National Park, the Rocky Mountains, and vast, undeveloped prairies are just a few reasons why hikers love Wyoming. If you're ready to explore the Cowboy State, consider the five hiking trails we've highlighted here as some of Wyoming's best based on recommendations from Trails.com, and keep an eye out for fossils!

Grand Teton Loop
A spectacular 33-mile loop along the mountain peaks and through the low country of the Grand Teton National Park lets hikers explore dozens of trails that permeate the best parts of the park, including Jenny Lake, the Alaska Basin, Cascade Canyon, and Inspiration Point. You can break this circuit up into a series of day hikes or complete the entire Grand Teton Loop in about four days.

Bechler River Trail
The 30-mile Bechler River Trail offers hikers a moderately easy route through the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park and treats them to views of waterfalls, mountains, meadows, alpine forests, and the Continental Divide. This hiking trail begins near Old Faithful, the park's most famous thermal geyser, and takes explorers along the scenic Bechler River and through a pristine area of the park.

Cloud Peak
The ascent of Cloud Peak is an 11-mile out-and-back hiking trail in the southwestern area of the Bighorn National Forest that is as challenging as it is rewarding. The trail to the overlook on Cloud Peak, the highest mountain in the Bighorn Range, takes hikers through the forest to unobstructed views of the surrounding mountains and wilderness.

Lizard Head Trail
Lizard Head Trail is a difficult, 42-mile hiking circuit through the southern part of the rugged and remote Wind River Range and crosses the Continental Divide twice. It takes hikers almost an entire week to complete the Lizard Head Trail tackling it straight on, or they can break up the many segments into day hikes to explore all the side trails.

Black Canyon of the Yellowstone Trail
The remote and beautiful Black Canyon of the Yellowstone Trail is an 18.5-mile point-to-point journey through the northern Rockies along the Yellowstone River (for most of the way). This is a fairly easy, downhill hike that's best broken up over two days due to the length, but the extra time offers excellent opportunities for fishing and observing wildlife.