Whether you're celebrating Valentine's Day or simply staying in for date night, picking the right romantic comedy can be essential to setting the mood. To help you out, we've put together this list of the 10 best rom coms of all time -- featuring one per decade, based on ratings from Rotten Tomatoes. Enjoy!

2010s -- Silver Linings Playbook

RT: 92% Fresh, 8.2/10

This 2012 feature starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence and Robert De Niro walks a very fine line between comedy and tragedy by delving into issues like death, mental illness and domestic violence. But after facing those issues together, the leading characters emerge from the emotional odyssey as stronger, more complete people.

And to lighten things up, the movie features plenty of dancing.

2000s -- High Fidelity 

RT: 91% Fresh, 7.7/10

Based on the novel of the same name by Nick Hornby, 'High Fidelity' (2000) stars John Cusack as a record store owner who is obsessed with making 'Top 5' lists. When his girlfriend Laura (Iben Hjejle) dumps him, his list of 'Top 5 Breakups' makes him turn his critical lens on himself, forcing him to take a life-changing look at his faults.

And along the way, he and his clerks (including Jack Black) tyrannize music geeks.

1990s -- Four Weddings and a Funeral

RT: 95% Fresh, 7.6/10

If you only have enough patience to watch Hugh Grant awkwardly stammer through courtship once, this 1994 British comedy is the one to see. The plot follows the slow maturation of Grant's character as he watches wedding bells thin out his group of friends.

And it probably has more f-bombs than any other rom com.

1980s -- The Princess Bride

RT: 97% Fresh, 8.3/10

Before 'Shrek' came out in 2001, the best self-aware fairytale that Hollywood had to offer was 'The Princess Bride' -- a swashbuckling romance filled with absurd plot twists, meme-worthy catchphrases and an actual giant...

1970s -- Annie Hall

RT: 99% Fresh, 8.9/10

'Annie Hall' (1977) stars Diane Keaton at her most charming and Woody Allen at his most neurotic as he tries to dissect why his relationship with the film's titular character collapsed. The movie frequently breaks the fourth wall and even includes an animated interlude. But the most surreal part is probably the number of pre-fame celebrities who had bit parts in the flick.

1960s -- The Apartment

RT: 93% Fresh, 8.5/10

In this 1960 classic, Jack Lemmon plays a lowly office drudge who tries to climb the corporate ladder by letting his superiors use his apartment for lecherous affairs. But his scheme goes haywire when he gets mixed up in a tryst involving his boss and an elevator operator played by Shirley MacLaine.

1950s -- Roman Holiday

RT: 98% Fresh, 8.4/10

Audrey Hepburn plays a princess who sneaks out of the palace to have a secret holiday away from the pomp and circumstance of the royal court. Along the way, she meets a handsome American reporter (Gregory Peck), who helps her rekindle a love affair with life.

1940s -- The Philadelphia Story

RT: 100% Fresh, 8.8/10

This high society comedy from 1940 features Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart and John Howard vying for the hand of a mischievous Philadelphia socialite played by Katherine Hepburn. So you could call it a love triangle with an extra point-- a love rectangle or rhombus, if you will.

1930s -- It Happened One Night 

RT: 98% Fresh, 8.9/10

This 1934 screwball comedy is the blueprint for 'Philadelphia Story,' 'Roman Holiday' and many other rom coms that came after it. Claudette Colbert stars as a socialite whose overbearing father imprisons her on a yacht until her reckless marriage to an opportunistic aviator can be annulled. After escaping his clutches, she heads out to find her husband, but a reporter (Clark Gable) steals her heart along the way.

The movie also features an autogyro. Apparently Mr. Burns didn't make it up.

The Silent Era -- City Lights

RT: 98% Fresh, 9.1/10

The best romcom from the time before talkies is undoubtedly 'City Lights' (1931), starring Charlie Chaplin as the Tramp and Virginia Cherrill as a blind flower girl that steals the heart of Chaplin's iconic character.