There's a special gift waiting for you online, from The Beatles! On Christmas Eve, all 13 of the Fab Four's albums will be available for the first time on Spotify, Apple Music, Google Play and Amazon Prime.

To celebrate the occasion, give a listen to this collection of Beatles songs that have cannabis connections. Enjoy!

1. 'Day Tripper' is an anthem for recreational use

John Lennon offered his take on the song's meaning during an interview with Playboy that took place shortly before his tragic death in 1979. "Day trippers are people who go on a day trip, right? Usually on a ferryboat or something," said Lennon. "But it was kind of - you know, you're just a weekend hippie. Get it?"

Cannabis aficionados certainly did. There's a strain named after the famous tune.

2. 'Got to Get You Into My Life' is a love letter to cannabis

The jubilant lyrics make this song sound like Paul McCartney's revelling in a new crush. And he is, but not for a girl. "It's actually an ode to pot," McCartney later explained, "like someone else might write an ode to chocolate or a good [red wine]."

3. 'Rain' got its signature sound from a happy accident

This psychedelic B-side of the Paperback Writer single isn't about cannabis, but it wouldn't have sounded the same without it. In 1980, Lennon commented on the track's interlude of music played backwards.

"I got home from the studio and I was stoned out of my mind on marijuana and, as I usually do, I listened to what I'd recorded that day. Somehow I got it on backwards and I sat there, transfixed, with the earphones on, with a big hash joint. I ran in the next day and said, 'I know what to do with it, I know... Listen to this!' "

4. 'With a Little Help from My Friends' doesn't mince words

Unlike most songs on the list, The Beatles weren't so subtle with this one. The lyric, "I get high with a little help from my friends," doesn't leave much to the imagination. But it gets the point across: a friend with weed is a friend indeed.

5. 'What's the New Mary Jane' is also self-evident

If you can't tell the song is about cannabis by the title, just give it a listen. This avant-garde track was recorded for The Beatles (a.k.a. The White Album) in 1968. But the band cut "Mary Jane" from the final set. It wasn't officially released by the band until 1996 as one of the many rarities on the third volume of The Beatles Anthology.

If you think the song's absolutely crazy, John Lennon would agree: at the end of the track, you can hear him say, "Let's hear it before we get taken away."

h/t Rolling Stone, Beatles Bible, Leafly, The Globe and Mail