Shortly before Canada made its historic move to legalize recreational cannabis, the South Korean Embassy in Canada took to Twitter to remind its citizens that the new law does not include them.

The tweet, when translated, states the following:

"Even if South Koreans are in a region where marijuana is legal, it will be illegal for them to consume it," and "please take care to not commit an illegal act and be punished."

So South Korean citizens are subject to the country’s criminal code no matter where in the world they might be.

While cannabis wasn’t officially banned in South Korea until the 1970s, the country takes a strong stance on the drug, reporting 12,000 cases of drug arrests in 2015, according to The Guardian.

Authorities typically do not subject citizens to drug tests when they return home, but they have been known to keep watch over those who’ve been caught with cannabis, sometimes going as far as to flag those who have boasted about their use online.

Additionally, Korean celebrities who’ve been caught using cannabis have been known to become subjects of scandal, and sometimes are even banned from performing because of it.

According to the New York Times, there are currently 23,000 South Korean students in Canada, and many more traveling to the country.