Somebody Planted Cannabis In Public Flower Pots Across Wyoming City

A rogue gardener has been leaving illicit surprises for city workers in Wyoming. This week cannabis plants were discovered growing in several public flower pots across the small city of Powell.

For weeks, employees of Powell's Department of City Parks and Recreation have been unwittingly caring for marijuana plants. It wasn't until the plants sprouted their tell-tale leaves that workers realized what they were watering.

Powell Police Chief Roy Eckerdt says he believes the seeds were planted by a prankster who wanted to play a joke on the city.

"My guess is that’s somebody’s sense of humor," Eckerdt told Powell Tribune.

Parks and Recreation Superintendent Del Barton said his workers have since pulled all the plants they've found and surrendered them to the police. But he says there still may be some more stashed around Powell.

"[The workers] just mentioned to me this morning that in the course of watering, they think—though we’re not sure yet—that there may be some additional ones popping up."

Whoever planted these seeds was quite bold, as the first plants discovered were just down the road from the police station. And that's not a prank for the faint of heart considering that Wyoming is one of the some of the toughest cannabis laws in the countryGrowing cannabis is a misdemeanor punishable with a maximum sentence of six months in jail or a fine up to $1,000. But if the cops decided that planting it across the city counts as distribution, then the green-thumbed bandit could face 10 years in prison plus a $10,000 fine.

10 years for a plant? Now that's a bad joke. 

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