A visit to the sauna leaves you warm, relaxed, and content. But up until recently, scientists didn’t know exactly what it was about saunas that made them good for your heart health.

The new study comes out of the University of Eastern Finland, because of course universities in Finland study saunas. Researchers analyzed the physiological effects of a sauna’s heat by having 100 subjects spend a half hour chilling in the sauna. Their blood pressure and heart rate were measured before, immediately afterwards, and then 30 minutes after bathing.

The research team discovered that immediately after the sauna bath, the subjects’ systolic and diastolic pressure were both reduced, and their heart rates were elevated to roughly the same rate as if they’d done some medium intensity exercise. Their core body temperature also rose by approximately two degrees celsius.

That means after bathing in a sauna, people had lower blood pressure and a higher heart rate, leading to a lower risk of cardiac disease and a slightly higher level of heart health.

This is not the first study on saunas from this research group because, once again, of course it isn’t.

The researchers previously published studies indicating that regular sauna use is associated with lower risks of sudden cardiac death, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia.

So rest assured: not everything that feels good is bad for you.