A Grieving PTSD Patient Had Her Medical Marijuana Seized By Canadian Border Services At Halifax Airport

Even with cannabis legalization now a reality in Canada, you still can't bring your prescription into the country.

Petite Henry has lost both of her children to suicide. Her medical marijuana is one of the few things that helps her through the profound grief that comes with the experience. However, her prescription was confiscated by Canadian Border Services when the Los Angeles resident arrived at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport on Friday.

"I was so distraught at that moment they took my medicine away that I wanted to turn around and go home," Henry told The Chronicle Herald. "It's that important to me and it’s what's keeping me alive. It's taken so much for me to get here and try to rebuild my life. People have no idea what losing a child to suicide is like, what that does to you."

Henry is a registered medical marijuana patient in her home of LA, and had assumed since medical marijuana is legal across Canada she wouldn't have an issue bringing her prescriptions with her. She says she had brought a 30 day supply of her medication with her—all of which was seized when she went through Canadian customs. The border agent suggested she purchase more from provincially-operated cannabis shops, but Henry has had difficulty finding the products she needs.

"I'm white knuckling it and already I've had a couple of breakdowns," she said.

Henry made the trip north to connect with her close friend Bobbie Cameron, who has suffered similar losses due to suicide. The two women both suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of their experiences and intend to launch a support group for women experiencing the loss of loved ones to suicide. Cameron says the seizure of her friend's medication is a huge violation and needs to be rectified.

"It's wrong and unjust to deprive Petite of her medicine," said Cameron. "I hope our federal government can see this."

And despite arriving to Halifax in the worst possible circumstances, Henry says she will be staying and is determined to launch her suicide support group.

The Canadian government absolutely needs to amend the Cannabis Act to allow patients to bring what is a legal medication into the country. Confiscation of medication is a cruel punishment that no one should ever have to experience.

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It costs an average of $4,000 for police to bring someone up on cannabis changes - but it could run the defendant as much as $20,000 to fight the case. It's no secret that a lot of taxpayer money is wasted each year on enforcing unjust marijuana laws. By some estimates, as much as $3.6 billion is spent every year arresting some 820,000 Americans on cannabis-related charges.

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