As it becomes clear that the American public is overwhelmingly in favor of legalizing cannabis, more politicians than ever began coming out in support of the marijuana movement over the past year. In celebration of these compassionate, forward-thinking public servants, here highlight three politicians in the United States Senate who came out of the marijuana closet in 2017 to give their support for the legalization of cannabis, either by attaching their name to new, less restrictive legislation or speaking out in favor of decriminalizing marijuana in some way.

1. Orrin Hatch (R-UT)

In September of this year, Senator Orrin Hatch introduced the Marijuana Effective Drug Study (MEDS) Act of 2017 in a show of support for improving the process for researching cannabis as medicine. Of looking into medical marijuana, he said:

“Our country has experimented with a variety of state solutions without properly delving into the weeds on the effectiveness, safety, dosing, administration, and quality of medical marijuana...To be blunt, we need to remove the administrative barriers preventing legitimate research into medical marijuana, which is why I’ve decided to roll out the MEDS Act.”

2. Kamala Harris (D-CA)

Kamala Harris, a first-term senator and former prosecutor, came out of the marijuana closet earlier this year when she spoke in favor of decriminalizing cannabis, saying:

“While I don’t believe in legalizing all drugs...we need to do the smart thing, the right thing, and finally decriminalize marijuana.”

3. Cory Booker (D-NJ)

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker emerged as a champion for legal cannabis in 2017, coming out of the marijuana closet is support or legalizing the herb perhaps more than any other lawmaker in Washington D.C. He has been a major force, introducing both the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act and the Marijuana Justice Act over the course of 2017, and taking a firm position opposing the federal laws against cannabis, saying in a Facebook video post:

“For decades, the failed War on Drugs has locked up millions of nonviolent drug offenders — especially for marijuana-related offenses — at an incredible cost of lost human potential, torn-apart families and communities, and taxpayer dollars.”