Believe it or not, we at Civilized actually read Playboy for the articles - especially the June issue that includes an essay on the state of D.A.R.E., the advocacy group dedicated to keeping marijuana and other drugs away from kids.

D.A.R.E. (which stands for Drug Abuse Resistance Education) was founded in 1983 during the heyday of President Ronald Reagan's intensification of Nixon's War on Drugs.

But now that Colorado and other states are experimenting with marijuana legalization as a way to keep cannabis away from children, D.A.R.E.'s role is shifting too. In some places, marijuana is being dropped from the curriculum because the group can't offer a consistent message.

"When we create a curriculum, we have to create one that fits all geographic areas," D.A.R.E.'s Regional Director Scott Gilliam told Playboy. "With all the controversy and changes within the marijuana arena, we had to leave marijuana out - we couldn't teach the same thing in Colorado that's being taught in some small community in Utah."

Gilliam added that police officers representing D.A.R.E. are instructed not to bring up marijuana when talking to children. But if the kids ask about it, the reps focus on addressing the effects cannabis can have on the developing mind, rather than wading into the murky state of the drug's legality in America.

But the program itself is also going through growing pains. In February 2016, the group caused confusion by making contradictory remarks about whether or not they considered marijuana a gateway drug that leads to abusing harder substances like cocaine and heroin.