There are many ways you can incorporate cannabis into your wedding.

Jennifer Borgh has pretty well seen them all.

The destination wedding planner from Toronto now resides in St. Ann, Jamaica (about an hour outside of Kingston), where she helps prospective newlyweds from all over the globe plan their ceremonies in paradise.

From time to time (and more and more frequently), that paradise includes cannabis.

“Most of my weddings are conventional weddings, but often they somehow incorporate [cannabis] at some point,” said Borgh, adding that a recent photo shoot she orchestrated for clients involved a joint rolling station, cannabis bouquets and cannabis boutonnieres.

Borgh hosted her first cannabis wedding last summer, just a little over a year after Jamaica decriminalized cannabis. Since then, she estimates that she’s planned roughly a dozen weddings with cannabis-friendly brides and grooms, chiefly hailing from the U.S. and Canada.

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Photography: Manuela Stefan

While many share similar themes – cannabis goodie bags for guests or specially labelled desserts are popular options – each cannabis wedding is different simply because of who’s planning and attending.

While Borgh said any number of adjustments can be made to cater to the tastes and preferences of those in attendance – a popular low-key option is to have a plate of infused treats available in a location only known by those who wish to consume – gauging your guests’ cannabis comfort levels prior to the ceremony is of paramount importance.  This is a great way to make those wedding songs sound a little better.

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Photography: Manuela Stefan

“I think the first thing [if you want to have a cannabis wedding] is to be really aware of your guests. Is this going to be okay with your guests? Are all of your guests okay with it? If it’s going to make people feel uncomfortable, maybe it’s not worth it,” said Borgh, adding that, “the good thing about a destination wedding is typically they’re more intimate, so you know your guests.”

“You’re not inviting your dentist’s sister’s cousin like you might in Toronto for some larger weddings,” she said. “You know your guests, you know what’s going to fly and you know they’re okay with [cannabis] even if they don’t partake in it.”

The second most important thing when planning your cannabis wedding, said Borgh, is to keep moderation in mind.

“Even though [cannabis] might be widely available, do you really want your guests falling asleep?” said Borgh, who isn't a cannabis consumer herself but jokes that she often considers taking it up since she's "become the expert."

“[Be mindful] of the kind of marijuana you pick to make sure your guests don’t fall asleep during the ceremony.”

When it comes right down to it, a cannabis wedding is really not all that different from a wedding where alcohol is the only substance available, said Borgh.

“It’s just an addition to a wedding you would’ve planned already,” she said, adding that cannabis has likely always been a part of weddings without any kind of official statement attached to it. “I think a lot of people smoke and maybe it’s a little bit more undercover at most weddings.”

That said, incorporating cannabis into your wedding can make for an experience unparalleled in intimacy, said Borgh.

“You have way bigger problems when people are drunk,” she said. “Cannabis changes the mood to one that’s calmer and more loving.”

Banner image: Photography by Manuela Stefan