Many Parents Continue To Smoke Cannabis After Having Kids, Finds Study

Having a kid doesn’t mean you have to cast off cannabis. In fact, many new parents don’t, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Washington’s Social Development Research Group found that while adults who consume cannabis typically curb their use when they become parents, they don’t necessarily quit completely.

Researchers observed 808 adults – parents and non-parents – who were first recruited for the long-term study as young students at Seattle elementary schools in the 1980s.

The participants were interviewed over the course of 12 years, ending in 2014 when most of them were 39 years old. A subset consisting of 383 parents were surveyed until 2011, before the state legalized cannabis.

While the results showed that a greater portion of non-parents (nearly 40 percent) at the age of 27 reported cannabis use in the last year, a still-significant 25 percent of parents reported the same. When parents entered their early 30s, cannabis use typically declined, with 16 percent of parents and 31 percent of non-parents reporting consumption in the last year.

Researchers also found that participants who started using cannabis as young adults were considerably more likely to consume it in their mid-to-late 30s, even after becoming parents.

This isn't the first time a study has linked parenthood with cannabis consumption. A poll conducted by Civilized in 2016, for example, revealed that most cannabis consumers are homeowners, employed full-time, and married with children. 

h/t United Press International 

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