Skip Stone and cannabis immediately clicked when they first met back in college. Their chemistry was so strong, in fact, that the now 46-year-old remembers thinking to himself: “This is something I’ll probably do forever.”

“I really connected with cannabis back in college. It just really worked for me, so it’s something I’ve done throughout most of my life,” Stone, the founder of StashLogix, tells Civilized. 

That didn’t change when Stone had his son, Henry, 12 years ago. And it didn’t change when he had his daughter, Ivy, three years later. If anything, Stone says, parenthood has brought new meaning to his relationship with the plant – as well as inspired his business, which produces lockable, smell-resistant containers for cannabis.

“When I had kids, in some ways it was like I needed [cannabis] more than I did before,” said Stone, who currently lives in Boulder, Colorado. 

For Stone, consuming cannabis has always been a way to “really focus on the present” – which tends to be important when you’re minding highly energized little ones.

“I guess the reason I felt [cannabis] was almost more important and necessary when I became a parent was because I really needed ‘me time’ after the kids had gone to bed. That, and I’m able to smoke a little bit and get to a level where I can play with the kids and actually be a better parent,” said Stone.

“As a parent, you want to have fun and be able to play with your kids; you don’t want to be thinking about all the millions of responsibilities you have... Cannabis helps you do that by changing your mindset and letting you be in the moment.”

Stone’s cannabis-friendly parenting style is by no means an anomaly. In fact, he’s just one in a growing number of U.S. parents who consume cannabis – and are proud of it.

A poll conducted by Civilized in 2016 found that 51 percent of cannabis users surveyed had children under the age of 13, while 27 percent had children between 13 and 17.

That’s a lot of folks who toke – and consequently, a lot of important (and occasionally difficult) conversations to be had between parent and child. For his part, Stone tries to be as “open and honest” as possible when it comes to talking about cannabis with his kids.

“I’ve told my kids what my business does and what cannabis does for people – how some use it medically and some recreationally. I also explain that it can cause problems down the road if you do certain things while your brain is still developing,” said Stone, who grew up in a “conservative Christian home” where the DARE philosophy was frequently touted.

“That’s kind of the angle I take with them: that there are lots of things out there and you have to wait until you’re ready [to try them]; and that everyone’s different and everyone will react to things differently.”  

Stone doesn’t smoke around his kids, but admits he still worries sometimes about the perceptions of people who don’t agree with his choice to consume cannabis and be open with his children about it.

“There are a lot of things to be nervous about with the new [White House] administration... I don’t want my kids walking around telling all their friends or teachers about [something they might see] as reckless behaviour,” said Stone. “Things are changing, though. It’s all moving in the right direction. It’s just a matter of time before [cannabis] is accepted and people become more open about it.”

This is our first instalment in a series on parents who consume cannabis. Check Civilized.life every week for another edition of 'Parents & Pot'.