Someone Invented a Paint That Can Mask the Smell of Marijuana

One of the biggest problems with smoking marijuana is the gosh darn smell. If you live in an apartment building, it can irritate your neighbors, and if you live at home, it'll piss off your parents. But now a new company says they have a solution.

A Colorado company called ECOBOND claims they've invented a paint specifically designed to hide the smell of marijuana. The paint is called OdorDefender and it contains an alginate from seaweed that is great at absorption. 

But it's not like they're just making this up. ECOBOND conducted a test where they basically lit marijuana and other smoking products and exposed them to drywall. They said the smell of cannabis on the drywall was extremely strong. They then painted the drywall with the OdorDefender paint as well as other paint brands. The company says that after adding only one coat of paint, after it dried a few days later, the staff could no longer smell any trace of marijuana. However they said other paint brands either still left a faint smell of marijuana, or even a still strong one a few days later.

Here's a picture of the drywall they used:

marijuana smoke paint 1

And here's a video explaining a little more about the product:

Granted, these aren't exactly laboratory conditions and obviously ECOBOND has some financial motive to talk up their results. But at the same time, they're also the only paint company making a product designed to eliminate marijuana smell, so you might as well take a chance, right?

Although it will probably still look suspicious if you still live with your parents and all of the sudden have a deep desire to re-paint your room.

(h/t Westword)

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