There may not be the Space Mountain-like lines that formed outside dispensaries on the first day of the legal recreational marijuana market last October. But retailers are still anticipating an eager market in Oregon now that edible products for recreational consumers can be legally sold for the first time today.

Sweet Tree Farms told The Register-Guard last month that it was adding six additional staff members to prepare for the increased business.

"It is going to be a crazy, crazy day," said manager Amanda Berry. "We even have jerky that is medicated, and ice cream."

Retailers in America's third state to legalize will be able to sell a new range of infused products, including concentrates and edibles, to non-medical users.

Medical dispensaries registered with the Oregon Health Authority will be allowed to sell THC-infused snacks and bars - as well as extracts that can be smoked or vaporized - to recreational consumers over 21 who were previously limited to flower only.

Non-medical users will be able to buy edibles with a maximum dose of 15 milligrams of THC, and extracts with 1,000 milligrams of THC or less, previously only available only to medical users with OMMP cards. Extracts and edibles will be taxed at 25 percent, the same tax already imposed on legal bud in Oregon.

Customers will be limited to one purchase per day

Dispensaries can only sell one edible, and one pre-filled cartridge of extract, per recreational customer per day, according to a Oregon Health Authority bulletin that went out earlier this week.

THC-containing topical creams, lotions and salves will also become legal for recreational sale.

For public safety reasons, Oregon is expanding the recreational market in stages. They are just introducing edibles now because of fears that new consumers might take doses that are too strong.

In an interview with Civilized when Oregon's recreational market was launched last fall, legalization advocate Anthony Johnson explained that the state wants to shore up positive public opinion - and avoid any "Maureen Dowd-type incidents" of accidental over-use - before expanding the market to include edibles.

Johnny Green, Oregon native and author of the The Weed Blog, said they may be playing it too safe with dosage limits, from the perspective of long-time cannabis consumers.

"It's going to be an exciting day for casual consumers who don't need a lot of THC to get the desired effects from an edible, but it will be less awesome for veteran consumers that are looking for high THC levels in recreational edibles."

h/t The Register-Guard