The Moody Blues owe the success of the psychedelic hit 'Nights in White Satin' to a DJ who needed to buy time for a bong rip.

When it was first released in 1967, 'Nights in White Satin' gained some attention in Britain but was largely overlooked in America because its runtime was too long for AM radio, which preferred tracks that were under 3 minutes. The Moodies managed to trim the song down to 3:06 and 4:26 on two different single releases, but neither caught on with AM radio DJs.

It wasn't until 1972 that the four-minute version gained traction on FM radio in Seattle. The catalyst for its success was a DJ who wanted to sneak out during the late shift so he could hit the bong, according to the band's drummer Graeme Edge.

"Some time later they interviewed the DJ who got it going in Seattle and he said, 'I was on the graveyard shift and I wanted to go out into the car park and smoke my bong and 'Nights in White Satin' was long enough to smoke," he told Rolling Stone recently.

"The second time he did it, the switchboard lit up like a Christmas tree," Edge recalled in an earlier interview with Uncut.

"If anybody asks me, 'To what do you owe your success?' I say, 'A junkie DJ.'"

So all those employers trying to ban smoking up at work might want to make an exception for DJs.

http://youtu.be/9muzyOd4Lh8