Out of the 86 million Netflix members around the world, more than 30 million tend to cleanse their palettes with a movie or two between TV show binges. 

This is just one illuminating finding from new research conducted by the online streaming giant on the trends of its members.  

Netflix analyzed viewing data from January to October of this year and discovered that when members switched from one TV series to another (completing all seasons available), 59 percent of the time they took a one-to-three day break before committing to a new show. During these breaks, 61 percent of those members watched a documentary, movie or stand-up special.

Overall, 36 percent of Netflix members exhibit this kind of binge-watching behavior, reports the site.

Binge Watching Netflix Cleanse The Palette

Digging deeper into these bingeing sessions, researchers uncovered certain movie and television show pairings frequently chosen by members; including "The Princess Bride" and "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt", along with "The Big Short" and "Orange is the New Black".

After watching "House of Cards", many members went on to watch "Beasts of No Nation", making the change from politics to war but sticking with a narrative of merciless leaders. Others often moved from "Breaking Bad" to "Pulp Fiction", while watchers of "Gilmore Girls" frequently went on to watch "Dirty Dancing" and "Sixteen Candles".

Members were also likely to pair similarly themed documentaries with movies they’d just watched; for example, they would watch "Narcos" and then opt for "Cartel Land".

One interesting exception to the pattern was the comedy genre. For example, when members watched a dark or scary television series, they were likely to turn to a comedy film before taking on another horror show. Several examples of these pairings included viewers shifting from "Stranger Things" to "Zootopia", or from "American Horror Story" to "Mean Girls".

“It’s interesting that in this golden age of television, movies are consistently in demand on Netflix,” said Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos in a written statement.

“What we’ve come to figure out is that movies are really an important part of people’s viewing routines and complementary to the way they watch and enjoy TV.”

h/t Forbes.