In partnership with Civilized, PSB conducted an online survey with 1,004 adults in the United States and 600 adults in Canada last February to better understand North Americans' views on cannabis. Both groups were made up of both marijuana users and non-users, and they were asked several questions about their personal cannabis habits, behaviors, and views.

On the U.S. survey, we posed the question "If there were a statewide election today, including a referendum on the ballot to legalize cannabis in your state, how would you vote?" and it's clear that most Americans would vote for legalizing marijuana in their home state today. More specifically, 58% of respondents said they support legalizing cannabis while only 19% said they would not vote, while 22% said they either wouldn't vote (11%) or didn't know (11%) if they would support the legalization of marijuana in their home state. The number of those who said they would vote in favor of legalizing the herb jumps to 90%, compared to only 5% opposed and 4% split between wouldn't vote/didn't know answers, when considering only respondents who consume cannabis.

The results from the Civilized/PSB survey are similar to those of other national polls. They are in line with a survey conducted by NBC News and the Wall Street Journal this past January found that 60% of Americans now support allowing adults to buy marijuana for personal use, up from 55% in their 2014 poll. The NBC/WSJ poll found the division is largely along political party lines, with 73% of Democrats and 64% of independents supporting legalization and only 43% of Republican respondents saying they would vote to legalize marijuana.

Asking if respondents would vote for legalizing marijuana in their home state was a new question added to the survey that PSB conducted for us last year, so unfortunately there were no results to compare. However, we predict that as the American public learns more about the positive effects of cannabis, more will answer that they would vote in favor of legalizing marijuana in their home state, not only for the herb's medical properties but also the economic boon cannabis can bring to local governments.