Yesterday the Mormon Church made their first public appearance at an anti-medical marijuana rally in Utah, and many wondered what their participation would entail. Unsurprisingly, they did not speak well of cannabis.

The Mormon Church added their name to a list of organizations opposed to this November's medical marijuana ballot initiative in Utah. In a statement at the rally, Mormon spokesperson Elder Jack N. Gerard said that the church does not necessarily oppose medical marijuana, but they would prefer if it were prescribed by doctors and given out through pharmacies.

“The church does not object to the medical use of marijuana if doctor prescribed in dosage form through a licensed pharmacy," Gerard said at the rally.

Of course, this is actually impossible. First of all, medical marijuana is almost universally sold through dispensaries in the United States, not pharmacies. But also doctors are not even allowed to legally prescribe medical cannabis since it's illegal at the federal level. But you don't see any Mormons trying to create a law making that legal.

The Church did say that their opposition at the moment is simply to the Utah medical marijuana ballot initiative, and that it should not be seen as a universal opposition to all medical marijuana laws throughout the United States. Gerard also stated that the church is not involved in a lawsuit filed by an anti-cannabis group that claims the Utah ballot initiative would violate Mormon religious freedom.

While most polls indicate at least 60 percent support for the ballot initiative in Utah, if the Mormon Church, which represents more than half of the state's voters, becomes more active in defeating it, the likelihood it will pass may decrease.

(h/t Salt Lake Tribune)