Of all the people who have endorsed marijuana legalization, the most high-profile supporter has to be God. That is, Morgan Freeman, who played God in Bruce Almighty (2003). Aside from starring in blockbusters like Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy and narrating documentaries such as The C Word (2016), Freeman - who turns 79 today - has also lent his soothing voice to speaking out for cannabis legalization.

Here are his top moments.

1. Pitching legalization

During a chat with Larry King last March, Freeman criticized the American government's hypocrisy on marijuana prohibition. "They can't continue to say that it's a dangerous drug when it's safer than alcohol," he said. In the full segment, he also said he wasn't choosy when it comes to which strains he'll smoke.

2. Medical marijuana patient

In a 2015 interview with the Daily Beast, Freeman opened up about using marijuana medicinally.

"Marijuana has many useful uses," he said. "I have fibromyalgia pain in this arm, and the only thing that offers any relief is marijuana. They're talking about kids who have grand mal seizures, and they've discovered that marijuana eases that down to where these children can have a life. That right there, to me, says, 'Legalize it across the board!'"

3. Recreational user

Freeman praises the health benefits of cannabis. But he also enjoys marijuana for the sake of enjoying it. In the same interview with The Daily Beast, he said, "How do I take it? However it comes! I'll eat it, drink it, smoke it, snort it!"

4. Secret of longevity

While promoting "Transcendence" in 2014, Freeman had a chat with Norwegian journalist Kjersti Flaa, who wanted to know the secret of his longevity. "Well," Freeman said with a chuckle, "you smoke enough marijuana, you're good - you'll get enough energy."

5. Easy Reader

One of Freeman's earliest roles was the hippie "Easy Reader," a recurring character on the PBS show The Electric Company (1971-1977). He didn't, of course, make any references to marijuana on the show. But just listen to him singing about reading being "out of sight" and forgive us for thinking Easy was grooving on something other than books.