Montana is a hiker's paradise, defined by vast expanses of untouched landscapes and wilderness spanning from the Great Plains to the Rocky Mountains. If you find yourself in Big Sky Country, consider taking one of the five hikes we've chosen based on recommendations from Hikespeak.com and Trails.com, and enjoy the views!

Highline Trail
The 15-mile trek through Glacier National Park called the Highline Trail takes hikers along the Continental Divide, known here as the Garden Wall, to scenic rests at the Haystack and Glacier Overlook. You'll hike through some of the most stunning landscapes of the Glacier's deep backcountry on your way up to the popular Granite Park Chalet.

Boiling River Trail

The trail to Boiling River is a simple, out-and-back hike to the most popular soaking location in Yellowstone National Park: a band of thermal pools along the Gardner River. At just over a mile in length, the Boiling River Trail is level and hard-packed, making it a fairly easy hike that lets you enjoy some of Yellowstone's beautiful scenery.



Pebble Creek Trail

The Pebble Creek Trail is a 12-mile out-and-back hike through the backcountry of Yellowstone National Park where you'll be treated to scenes of low-lying meadows, stands of tall evergreens, and soaring mountain peaks. Of particular interest are stunning views of Amphitheater Mountain, Abiathar Peak, and Soda Butte Creek, and keep in mind this hike requires you to ford Pebble Creek several times, so bring water-friendly footwear.


Nyack Creek / Coal Creek Trail

The arduous 43-mile Nyack Creek / Coal Creek Trail takes hikers into some of the most primitive and remote areas of Glacier National Park's backcountry. The round-trip “Nyack Coal Creek Loop” is a long trek that should only be traversed by experienced hikers and backpackers, but the isolation and opportunity to see areas of true wilderness is well-worth the trip.



East Rosebud Trail

Hiking the 26-mile East Rosebud Trail lets you experience the Rocky Mountains and surrounding Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness in relative solitude. Also known as the Beaten Path, the East Rosebud Trail takes hikers past alpine lakes, craggy peaks, and pristine forests while treating them to trail-side berries and chances to see native wildlife.