The Rolling Stones Single You've Probably Never Heard

The Rolling Stones are ranked among the top rock bands of all time, but in their early years, Mick Jagger - who turns 73 today - and the rest of the group were struggling for recognition and airplay after their first original tune was banned for its marijuana content.

In 1963, the Stones were desperate for a follow-up to their first single - a cover of Chuck Berry's Come On. Jagger and Keith Richards met up with John Lennon and Paul McCartney of Beatles fame, who offered them the poppy I Wanna Be Your Man. With that cover in the bag as the A-side, they needed something for the B-side. The Stones got together and turned a jam into the bluesy, rambling tune called "Stoned" - the band's first original track.

The song sounds pretty much how you would expect based on the title. It's short on lyrics. Jagger's distorted voice mainly punctuates breaks in the jam by saying "Stoned," "Out of my mind," "Where am I at?" and other things you'd expect of someone who's a bit catatonic. And that's why the song was shelved when the group was ready to release the new single outside of the UK. To avoid causing controversy, the band released Not Fade Away as the B-side instead, making "Stoned" one of the hardest Stones songs to find in the U.S. for decades.

Censorship, however, didn't make the Stones clean up their act. Instead, they kept pushing boundaries while the times slowly caught up to them when the psychedelic 60s kicked off a few years later. 

Check out "Stoned" here:

Banner image: Mick Jagger arriving the Premiere of 'Crossfire Hurricane' during the 56th BFI London Film Festival in London in 2012. (Alexandra Glen / Shutterstock.com) 

Latest.

Rock icon David Crosby is not one to mince words - even when criticizing himself, which is a recurring theme in the new documentary 'David Crosby: Remember My Name.' And he's just as unapologetically candid when the cameras are off, I learned after chatting with Crosby over the phone to discuss the premiere of the doc, which opens this weekend (July 19) in New York and Los Angeles. So far, the doc has received excellent reviews from critics who find his frankness refreshing in an age when so many public figures are afraid to go off script and drop their filters. "Nobody does that anymore," Crosby told Civilized.

Can we see some ID please?

You must be 19 years of age or older to enter.