When it comes to women and men and the different ways they respond to workplace bullying, it's a matter of taking meds or taking off. 

A new study has found that men are twice as likely as women to leave their jobs following incidents of workplace bullying. 

The study, conducted by researchers from Denmark’s Aarhus University and the University of Copenhagen, looked at data gathered from 3,182 workers who participated in Denmark’s 2006 Bullying Cohort Study.

For women, workplace bullying led to victims taking double the amount of sick days and an increase in antidepressants. For men, up and leaving was the more common reaction. Men were twice as likely to leave the job market for a stretch of time following workplace bullying.

Aarhus University professor Tine Mundbjerg Eriksen, said she and her fellow study authors were surprised by this difference in the sexes. 

“In fact, it seems that men who are bullied are more likely than women to go to work even though they’re actually sick,” she said. “At the same time, it appears that bullying affects men’s salary level negatively, which indicates that the bullying hampers their opportunities for pay increases and promotions.”

The study also found that while both sexes are equally confronted with workplace bullying, men are slightly more likely to have to deal with physical intimidation.

The authors noted that workplace bullying can come in the form of coworkers or bosses interfering with an employee’s ability to do their job, making alterations to their work, or frequently assigning coveted tasks to others.

h/t Yahoo Finance.