Male and female hearts age differently, scientists have learned.

This discovery was published in the journal Radiology in October. Researchers found that the left ventricle - which pumps oxygenated blood out of the heart and into the body - tends to thicken over time in men while thinning in women.

Both conditions can lead to heart failure, but in different ways. And each may require different treatments. Many heart medications thin the ventricle's tissue, which may help men while offering no benefit to women.

In a statement released by Johns Hopkins Medicine, study co-author João Lima said, "Our results are a striking demonstration of the concept that heart disease may have different pathophysiology in men and women and of the need for tailored treatments that address such important biologic differences."

The study was based on 10 years of research focusing on men and women of different ages, body types, weights, ethnicities, and lifestyles. But despite such variety, the differences between the sexes were consistent. That means sex-specific analysis and treatment of heart disease may be a milestone in combating heart-disease.

While the development of heart disease differs between males and females, it remains the leading cause of death for both sexes in America.

h/t Live Science, Medical Daily