Stacey Mulvey loves teaching movement, viewing it as a spectrum of energy - from yin to yang and everything in between. Growing up in SLC Utah, Mulvey left the Mormon church at 21 in protest over its discrimination towards the LGBTQIA+ community, women, and minorities. Overweight and unhappy, she began practicing and teaching mindful movement in Callanetics after having an epiphany about mortality and taking control of her own quality of life. Eventually, Mulvey discovered that cannabis helps her concentrate and enhances her motivation. Upon moving to Colorado, she began teaching pole dancing at Boulder Spirals while training directly under second-generation Pilates instructors and founders of the internationally renowned Pilates Center of Boulder, the world's foremost teacher training school for classical Pilates instructors. Mulvey continued her studies at Naropa University in yoga, painting, and psychology. After completing her coursework honing her skills in mindful and meditative practices, Mulvey launched Marijuasana where she now travels the U.S. and internationally teaching all-inclusive classes fusing the wonders of cannabis with yoga, flow, and mindfulness meditation.

Tell us about your typical day.
I wake up and straight away do my “morning pages.” They are three long-handwritten pages that are complete brain drain. The point is to write complete stream of consciousness words on a page in order to siphon off what’s blocking you from your creativity. Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way, prescribes doing them as part of her program to reawaken your creativity. Doing them has been life-changing. After the morning pages, I grab some coffee and look at my phone. Then, I do Pilates and take a cold shower. Cold showers have also been a life-saver for me.

What's one prediction you have for the marijuana industry five years from now?
I think the stoner-bro stereotype will finally be downplayed, and that there’s a huge wave of support for positioning cannabis as a wellness product. Unlike some, I don’t think we’ll ever shift away from using marijuana leaves in our branding, but I think that before we know it, the symbol will also come to represent holistic healing, thoughtfulness and maturity. For many decades now, it’s been viewed through the lens of being part of a somewhat juvenile culture. Which let’s face it, it has been. Though I love cannabis culture dearly, and actively participate in it, I believe there’s room for including a much larger narrative about cannabis and that we are just seeing the beginning.

What is one change you'd like to see happen in the cannabis industry?
More people of color. I would like to see more diversity in our industry.

What's your perfect setting to consume? (place, music, food, etc.)
I love consuming in nature. So a joint, with a friend or two, and outdoor scenery to look at as we smoke and then play afterward. Consuming outside is just the best.

What is your go-to munchie?
Justin’s Chocolate Hazelnut Butter blend. I take it neat, by the spoonful. It’s got a reasonable amount of calories in it, and since I try to be mindful about what I’m going for when I get a craving for something delicious, I know I’m not going crazy on snacks.

Now I know what you’re thinking: “oh, that’s basically Nutella”

Incorrect. This is better than Nutella. This is thick, less sugary, more balanced cocoa spread that has just a hint of salt in it. I must have it on hand at all times. I make my shopping decisions based on whether or not stores carry this product. It is divine.

What's your favorite way to consume cannabis?
My favorite way is smoking. I’m an old fashioned gal, and love the sensual experience of smoking. Always have, always will. Although I’m trying to be mindful of healthy lungs and do more vaporizing when I know the product is legit.

Tell us the story of the first time you consumed marijuana.
I was 17, at a party at a friend’s house. I had been such a goody two-shoes up until that point in my life. Never drank, never got high. I was always the friend that hung out with everyone while they had fun. I was trying to leave the Mormon church, and was always wrestling with guilt and whether I was going to go to hell. Finally, I was like, I don’t believe this shit any more. What am I afraid of?

When I went home later that night, I was checking in with my feelings on whether I felt any guilt over getting high. I had always envisioned “sinning” as something you immediately regret because you would immediately feel so awful. I thought you’d sense God’s anger and that once you sinned, you just kept going because it was easier than making God happy again.

Well, I didn’t feel sad or scared. I felt great! I was happy. Then, an old Sheryl Crow song came on the radio. The lyrics said, “If it makes you happy, it can’t be that bad.” I chose to take that as a sign that I wanted to start following my own beliefs. Instead of worrying about religion, I wanted to begin discovering what made me happy in my life.

Do you have a message for Donald Trump and/or Jeff Sessions? What would that message be?
You are on the wrong side of history.