There have been a few studies in recent months to suggest that marijuana use could have a negative effect on a person's heart health. However, a new study says there's no evidence to that claim.

Researchers from California, Pennsylvania and New York examined dozens of studies that claimed that marijuana use had a negative effect on a person's heart health. They determined that most of these studies were highly flawed and that the evidence the presented was "insufficient."

The most notable study they documented was one that came out last August that said marijuana users were three times more likely to die from hypertension than non-users. But what the study didn't note was that their definition of a "marijuana user" was anyone who had used the drug at least once in their entire lifetime. So a person who smoked one joint at 18 and then never again the rest of their life was considered a marijuana user for the purpose of the study. That's just too broad a definition.

There are a few things we do know about marijuana use and the heart. We do know that using cannabis raises a person's heart beats per minute for up to three hours after consumption, although it's not known if this is harmful to the user's health. It's also pretty well-documented that marijuana use lowers blood pressure, as studies have shown that as well as others that showed people who stopped using cannabis often saw their blood pressure increase after quitting.

To put it simply, almost any previous study that claims marijuana negatively affects heart health is highly flawed and should be taken with a grain of salt. That doesn't necessarily mean that cannabis use is good for your heart, either. But there are definitely other things to avoid putting in your body that take precedence over marijuana.

(h/t Business Insider)