From free-loving hippies, to ancient Hindu tantra practitioners, people have used cannabis for its properties as a spiritual, sensual aphrodisiac - one that can slow down lovemaking and seem to offer a more transcendental connection. But can cannabis actually promote multiple orgasms?

The answer is a resounding "yes, yes, YES" according to the results of a survey on single pot smokers recently released by Match.com.

"People who are open to marijuana use are 109% more likely to have had multiple orgasms," according to data collected from over 5,000 representative American singles.

Less clear were the reasons why cannabis users might be more inclined to experience the phenomena. Does being high mean you're less inclined to engage in climax-impeding overthinking? More relaxed? Simply willing to spend longer in bed? The data also suggested multiple orgasms aren't the only sexual upside for pot smokers, who also, reportedly, "have 3.6 percent more orgasms per sexual encounter." They're also less-shy about taking things to the next level, since cannabis consumers are "30 percent more likely to want to make out at the end of a date."

Some strains make you more sexual, others not

But before you rush out and purchase some schwag in hopes of spicing up your sex life, be aware: your mileage may vary. As one respondent to a Psychology Today query on cannabis on sex wrote: "Contrary to popular belief, not all buds are alike. Some weed makes you want to be very sexual and I've had some of the best orgasms of my life after using marijuana. Some of it makes you feel more introverted and thoughtful."

In addition to the difficult-to-harness properties of the plant, there's also some decidedly unsexy research out there suggesting cannabis can contribute to erectile dysfunction for some men, and can lead others to feel introspective and even turned off.

Also: the sensation of endless arousal might be all in the user's heads, according to information published by the University of California, Santa Barbara. "Marijuana may distort users' sense of time, thus, creating the illusion of prolonged arousal and orgasm," the site says.

It also adds that while some users experience ramped-up desire while under the influence, "others experience the converse effect [... ] reporting a substantially decreased sexual drive when stoned."

One thing we can take away? If pot smokers really are putting all this effort into having, or giving partners, multiple orgasms, they can't be as lazy as some still believe.