Not long ago, you 100 percent had to 'know a guy,' or a girl, in order to find work in the marijuana industry. Then, you had to watch patiently and do a lot of internet research, often under furtive, less-than-ideal conditions , before starting to actually make money.

But with 23 states and the District of Columbia legalizing marijuana in some form, and Canada poised to follow suit, the sketchy dealings formerly required to get a gig are as passé as the stigma around marijuana use. Working in the cannabis industry is increasingly like working anywhere else - and that includes the tedium of trawling through job postings.

People keep calling WeedHire.com the "Monster.com of marijuana": kind of apropos, given the site's 8,000 registered users and release of its Android app last September. The idea is simple: matching up skilled workers with jobs in the legal cannabis industry.

A wide range of good jobs available

Some, more plum positions currently posted on WeedHire include a bud tending job at Roseanne Barr's new dispensary in Santa Ana; a large-scale warehouse in Denver with over 200 grow lights in the market for a lead grower; a graphic design internship at cannabis product manufacturer ebbu, and an advertising sales rep gig at Hail Mary Jane.

While an entry-level bud-trimming job might not boast a great salary, it could be a way into an increasingly competitive industry. Much better remuneration - including some six-figure salaries - are within reach if you're, say, writing policy for state governments or filling senior roles in lab testing or cultivation.

The range of new jobs will broaden as many states, and Canada, introduce ballot measures to legalize and work out regulatory standards. Many jobs in the legal industry, like security, marketing, and web design, already exist - and are in high demand as entrepreneurs race to launch in nascent markets.

"We don't know how many jobs could be created in the sector," WeedHire founder David Bernstein told Yahoo, "but I would venture to guess 100,000 — double if you count ancillary businesses."

In short, it might be worth your while to dust off the ol' resume.