The Marijuana Majority Celebrities Supporting Clinton Instead of Sanders

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is by far the most progressive presidential candidate on the marijuana issue. So you might be surprised that his pledge to repeal federal marijuana prohibition and end the War on Drugs hasn't won over many prominent Marijuana Majority alumni. Here are five pro-legalization celebrities who are Climbin' the Hill rather than Feelin' the Bern.

1. Snoop Dogg

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The rap icon and marijuana businessman is putting feminism before legalization this fall.

During a May 2015 interview on Bravo's "Watch What Happens Live," a caller phoned in to ask Snoop about his voting preferences. "I would love to see a woman in office because I feel like we're at that stage in life...where we need the perspective other than a male's train of thought," he said. "And just to have a woman speaking from a global perspective as far as representing America, I would love to see that. So I'll be voting for Ms. Clinton."

2. Morgan Freeman

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In a March interview with Larry King, the actor who portrayed the voice of god revealed that he uses marijuana to treat fibromyalgia. But he also lent support to legalizing recreational use when he said, "They can't continue to say that it's a dangerous drug when it's safer than alcohol."

A month earlier, Freeman told CNN that wasn't any danger in electing Hillary Clinton, whom some consider untrustworthy. And he's offering the former secretary of state more than mere lip service. The actor has lent his famous voice to Hillary's campaign in ads such as this:

3. Bryan Cranston

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Although more famous for playing the chemistry teacher turned meth dealer on AMC's "Breaking Bad" (2008-2013), Bryan Cranston spoke out against marijuana prohibition in a 2012 interview with High TImes.

"Marijuana started out with a bad connotation, as you know - but to me, marijuana is no different than wine. It's a drug of choice. It's meant to alter your current state - and that's not a bad thing. It's ridiculous that marijuana is still illegal. We're still fighting for it."

And he seems to favor Clinton to carry on that fight for America. Last October, the L.A. Times revealed that Cranston was among Hillary's more prominent donors.

4. Tony Bennett

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Okay, you're probably more surprised to see that the famous crooner is pro-marijuana, so let's backtrack a bit. After learning of Whitney Houston's fatal drug overdose in 2012, Bennett made the following plea at a pre-Grammy Awards party:

"First it was Michael Jackson, then it was Amy Winehouse and now the magnificent Whitney Houston. I'd like to have every gentleman and lady in this room commit themselves to get our government to legalize drugs. So they have to get it through a doctor, not just some gangsters that sell it under the table."

Yet Bennett isn't supporting Sanders, the candidate who comes closest to that goal by promising to end America's drug war. Instead, he's helped Clinton drum up support by performing at a June 2015 fundraiser.

5. Mary-Louise Parker

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You might be surprised that the star of Showtime's "Weeds" (2005-2012) - America's first marijuana sitcom - isn't a cannabis consumer. But she does support overhauling America's marijuana laws. In an interview with WebMD, Parker said:

"Historically, being caught is not a deterrent. If you can control it, maybe marijuana is not as dangerous and not part of another world of harder narcotics. To have people in the park outside my house trying to sell me stuff when I'm pushing a stroller -- that's not awesome. [But] anything that's going to lessen crime in any small way is a good idea, and what they're doing now just doesn't work."

That might be why she prefers Clinton's cautious approach to cannabis reform.

h/t The Hill, The Huffington Post, Variety

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