In many states, cannabis legalization advocates face stiff competition from within their own movement. In California, nine groups are competing for signatures for the 2016 ballot question that could make recreational cannabis legal there.

In Massachusetts, four separate groups are vying for signatures and votes. In Ohio, one legalization group is campaigning against another's ballot initiative, which will take place Nov. 3.

With so much competition, there's real danger that the divided groups will defeat themselves.

Maine groups find a way to work together

That's an outcome Maine's two prominent advocacy organizations hope to avoid. On Oct. 26, The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol announced it would work with Legalize Maine to collect the 61,000 signatures needed to make legalization a ballot issue in the Pine Tree State.

Separately, the groups had collected approximately 40,000 signatures, so there's a good chance that uniting their efforts will make way for a vote.

Tom Angell of Marijuana.com notes that each group's measures were similar, but Legalize Maine's approach is, "less restrictive, both on individual consumers and on the would-be-legal industry."

Some of the business-friendly perks of Legalize Maine's approach include a flat tax rate, a cheaper license for retailers, and no limits on the number of cannabis stores that can open in Maine.

But there are plenty of perks for consumers too: a higher cap on the amount for personal possession, an increase in the number of plants that can be cultivated at home, and licenses for cannabis social clubs.

Here's Regulate Maine's rundown of the major differences between the two initiatives:

Now the groups can set sights on their common enemy: pot prohibition.

h/t Marijuana.com, Yahoo News, Sun Times, Weed Blog,