The Rincon Valley Union School District previously blocked five-year-old Brooke Adams from attending elementary school in Santa Rosa, California with her medical marijuana. Now, a state judge has ruled the girl can go - with her medicine.

"I was so overwhelmed with emotion and joy that we don't have to fight anymore after a battle of over two years," Brooke's mother Jana Adams told The Press Democrat. "I'm grateful that we had this ruling so she can just go to school like any other child and we don’t have to keep pushing to get what she needs."

On Friday state administrative law Judge Charles Mason overruled the Rincon Valley Union School District decisions to prevent brook from attending class with her cannabis-based medications. Brooke suffers from a rare form of epilepsy called Dravet Syndrome which has been proven to be effectively treated with medicinal marijuana oils. Jana says Brooke's medication has already prevented three hospital visits during her time in kindergarten over the past month.

"She has [seizures] at different times of the day, and you don't know when it comes," said Adams. "To be able to see the marijuana working and not have to call 911 because it stops the seizure is amazing."

As medical marijuana becomes increasingly recognized as a treatment for conditions such as epilepsy parents across the country will continue to fight for their children to attend schools with their medications. However, with the recent FDA approval of a cannabis-based drug for epilepsy treatment, hopefully we won't see these kinds of cases too much in the near future.