Japan Joins South Korea in Telling Citizens They Could Be Punished for Using Legal Marijuana in Canada

Yesterday we reported that citizens in South Korea could face punishments in their home country if they use legal marijuana in Canada. And it appears South Korea isn't the only Asian country taking this stance.

Japan has followed South Korea in saying their citizens could be punished for using legal marijuana in Canada. The Japanese consulates in both Vancouver and Toronto issued warnings this month saying that the country's Cannabis Control Laws can be applied to their citizens even when overseas, and they advised their citizens to avoid any cannabis products regardless of whether they're legal in those foreign countries.

Last year Japanese police took action against a record 3,008 people for marijuana-related crimes. The country is known to have harsh anti-marijuana laws, including a possible five-year prison sentence for cannabis possession.

The question is whether these laws could actually be enforced overseas. Japanese authorities would need to prove that the person committed the crime in the foreign country, which can be difficult considering they're separate by an entire ocean.

The bigger worry is probably for people who are attempting to enter the country with cannabis. Singer Paul McCartney famously was arrested and later deported from Japan in 1980 for attempting to bring marijuana into the country.

So if you're a Canadian traveling to Japan in the near future, we highly recommend that you leave your stash at home next to your hockey stick.

(h/t Japan Times)

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