If Attorney General Jeff Sessions seriously doubts that medical marijuana is a safer and more effective painkiller than oxycodone and other opioids, then he should talk to Kristina Manning — a grandmother in Tennessee who stopped using 7 different medications after trying cannabis.

“I have two bulging discs, one in lower spine, and one in cervical spine, which I had surgery through the front of my neck,” Manning told Nashville's WKRN recently. “I got completely off of all narcotics in three months by using medical marijuana.”

Unfortunately, that was back when she lived in California, where medical marijuana has been legal since 1996. So it wasn't hard for her to find the joints and edibles she needed to treat her spinal stenosis — a painful bone condition. But since moving to Tennessee, where medical marijuana is still prohibited, she's had to switch back to taking prescription pills, including two types of opioids that have contributed to America's deadly overdose epidemic.

“I have to take two, three, four, sometimes five [bottles],” Manning added. “Seven [pills] a day in the morning when i first wake up.”

But that could change now that the Tennessee state legislature is considering a bill that would allow patients to use oils extracted from cannabis. To advocate for the bill, Manning is speaking out about her cannabis use. She hopes her example will shatter stoner stereotypes and redefine the public's image of cannabis consumers.

“I’m a grandmother, I’m a taxpayer, I’ve never been in trouble in my whole life,” said Manning. “I’m just trying to help.”