Whether you've been hiding your cannabis use from your parents since you started smoking or you have clear memories of them busting you with weed when you were a kid, talking to your folks about smoking weed can be an intimidating, sometimes surreal experience. As cannabis laws across the country relax, it's more important than ever for parents and their mature children to have open (and open-minded) discussions about smoking weed and using marijuana in general. Even though everyone's family is different, there are a few things you can do to make sure that having a talk with your parents about smoking weed goes well and doesn't deteriorate into an argument.

1. Reflect on what you already know about how your parents feel about smoking weed or if they have shared any used of cannabis with you. This will help guide how you broach the subject, as you can (probably) adopt a more straight-forward approach with parents who have talked about their experiences with cannabis than parents who have touted “Just Say No” since you can remember.

2. Bring up the topic of smoking weed with your parents in a private setting where you know you will all feel comfortable. Unless you plan on sitting them down and starting a conversation by disclosing your cannabis use up-front, try to take advantage of an opportunity where the topic of marijuana comes up naturally. Also, try to choose a time when they seem calm and in a good mood - you know your parents and when they are most approachable about touchy subjects.

3. Prepare for some awkwardness, especially if your parents seem caught off-guard by the conversation. They will probably have a lot of questions, so be ready to defend your own smoking habits and explain if you use marijuana for medicinal purposes or enjoyment.

4. Have plenty of well-researched facts to support your claims about the benefits of smoking cannabis and present yourself as a responsible marijuana user.

5. Don't be demeaning or disrespectful if find that your parents are adamantly against cannabis use; you must be willing to drop the conversation if it gets heated or divisive and (hopefully) revisit it another time. You have nothing to apologize for if you support yourself, but your parents also have a right to form their own opinions.