Here's How Marijuana Advocates Really Feel About Jeff Sessions Quitting as Attorney General

Earlier this month, Jeff Sessions resigned as Attorney General, a move that many marijuana advocates celebrated. But after a few weeks to let the initial reaction fade away, are cannabis fans still excited about the move? Yes, yes they are.

The Los Angeles Times documented how relieved many marijuana advocates are in the aftermath of Sessions leaving the Attorney General's office. Current Congressman and about to be Colorado Governor Jared Polis said Sessions “had it out for states that have legalized marijuana.” And even Sessions' fellow Republicans were happy about the news, as Colorado Republican Senator Cory Gardner responded to the resignation by saying, “I look forward to continuing to work with the president to fulfill his campaign position to leave the regulation of marijuana to the states.”

Many see Sessions' ouster as the removal of the biggest roadblock towards federal reform of marijuana laws. Many are now optimistic that Congress will either outright legalize marijuana, or at the very least pass laws to protect states that enact legalization.

“Sessions' stance on cannabis had been a major impediment toward cannabis reform,” said Stuart Titus, CEO of Medical Marijuana, Inc. “And now industry participants hold new hopes for sweeping change at the federal level.”

While Sessions never did anything to directly interfere with states with legalized marijuana, he often made symbolic gestures or made public statements asserting that he would. This would often lead to negative impacts on cannabis stocks as a result. But with Sessions gone, many are hoping those random dips in share prices are a thing of the past, which probably explains why so many cannabis companies saw huge stock increases the day after the resignation.

Still, it's not a guarantee that whoever replaces Sessions will be a pro-marijuana Attorney General. But everyone agrees there's no way that person could be worse than Jeff.

(h/t LA Times)

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I've been covering cannabis for nearly five years, and by now I'm all too accustomed to the impersonal cannabis conference at a stuffy, generic hotel or expo hall, brimming with white guys in suits, and generally lacking in the spirit of well, cannabis. (The woes of legalization, I suppose.) So it was a breath of fresh air when I walked into what felt like a giant atrium in downtown LA for a new kind of cannabis conference. Located in what's called the Valentine Grass Room in an industrial area past the hustle and bustle of the DTLA skyscrapers, Microscopes & Machines (M&M) boasted a diverse array of speakers, from doctors and lawyers to chemists and cultivators on the frontlines of the cannabis industry.

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