Homer Simpson Will Be Inducted Into The Baseball Hall Of Fame. Seriously.

Homer Simpson is set to become the first fictional television character to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the baseball-themed Simpsons episode 'Homer at the Bat', the show's patriarch will take his place in the annals of sports history alongside Wade Boggs, Ken Griffey, Jr. and Ozzie Smith -- real hall-of-famers who played themselves on the episode.

Homer will be inducted during a special ceremony in Cooperstown, New York during the Hall of Fame Classic Weekend on May 27.

“In Cooperstown, we salute baseball’s greatest contributors, preserve its vast history and salute the cultural side of the sport," Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson said in a press release. "We are honored to pay tribute to the 25th anniversary of ‘Homer at the Bat.’ THE SIMPSONS has left an impressive imprint on our culture as the longest-running American sitcom, and ‘Homer at the Bat’ remains as popular today as when the episode aired in 1992. Baseball is recognized as our National Pastime due to its wide intersection with American culture over the last two centuries, evident in literature, theater, language, art, music, film and television. THE SIMPSONS is a perfect example of that connection to Americana.”

The induction ceremony will include a roundtable discussion of the episode featuring Boggs, Smith as well as members of the episode's production crew: executive producers Al Jean and Mike Reiss, director Jim Reardon, executive story editor Jeff Martin and casting director Bonnie Pietilla.

And in case you're wondering, Darryl Strawberry hasn't been honored by the hall of fame yet. So Homer's induction settles the rivalry between these sports legends once and for all.

Banner image: youtube.com 

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