Is a ceaseless string of yawns the only thing getting in the way of your big artistic breakthrough (or so you like to think)?

A new study suggests your creative brain may be to blame.

Researchers compared art and social science students and found that visually creative students reported generally lower sleep quality.

"Visually creative people reported disturbed sleep leading to difficulties in daytime functioning," said study author Neta Ram-Vlasov of the University of Haifa.

The study – conducted by researchers at the University of Haifa, Assuta Medical Center and Yezreel Valley College – looked at 30 undergraduate students from seven schools. Half the participants were majoring in art and half were majoring in social sciences.

Throughout the study period, the participants underwent electrophysiological sleep recordings, wore wrist activity monitors and filled out sleep diaries and questionnaires on their sleep habits. They were also tasked with completing visual and verbal creativity tests.

The researchers found that those participants with higher levels of visual creativity generally slept more hours, but had lower sleep quality, which manifested itself in frequent sleep disturbances and daytime dysfunction.

"It is possible that a 'surplus' of visual creativity makes the individual more alert, and this could lead to sleep disturbances," the researchers said.

So it seems your future masterpiece may come at a price. But at least an artistic career means you probably don’t have to be up by 7 a.m.

h/t Science Daily